National STEM Video Game Challenge

Coding Challenge

Presented by theJoan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame WorkshopandE-Line Media, with founding sponsor theEntertainment Software Association(ESA), the STEM Challenge was launched in 2010 as part of the White Houses Educate to Innovate campaign. The challenge was designed to motivate interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) among youth by harnessing their natural passion for playing video games and inspiring them to design games of their own. This year,Games for Changesponsored a special prize for games designed to help players learn, improve their communities, and contribute to making the world a better place. The winners of the 2017 STEM Challenge and the related2017 National Games for Change Student Challengewere also recognized at the Games for Change Festival in New York City today.

Nothing from May 23, 2018 to June 22, 2018.

Since the challenge was launched in 2011, students have designed and submitted nearly 20,000 original games and game design documents over six competition cycles. Not only are this years student winners remarkably accomplished young people, they are among the most diverse yet, and the games that theyre making include characters who look like them and reflect the diversity of the people who enjoy playing games, said Mark German, president, E-Line Education. Were thrilled that the games for the STEM Challenges final year have been among the strongest yet.

The National STEM Video Game Challenge today announced the winners of the 2017 competition. This years winners include 23 middle and high school students who submitted original video games and game design concepts in platforms including GameMaker, Gamestar Mechanic, Scratch, and Unity. Presented by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and E-Line Media, []

The 24 middle and high school winners of the 2016 STEM Challenge andNat Geo Explore Prizewere honored at an awards ceremony at National Geographic in Washington, DC on November 14, 2016, with top original video games and game design concepts selected in 18 categories from nearly 3,000 entries. Check out the winners and their games by watching the video below and visiting the2016 Challenge Winners Gallery.

Each winner receives a cash prize of $1,000, a lifetime premium consumer subscription to Gamestar Mechanic, and the opportunity for a consultation with a game industry professional for advice on developing his or her interest and skills in design, engineering, or game-making.

On November 14, 2016, the National STEM Video Game Challenge celebrated its fifth year with an awards ceremony and reception in Washington, DC at National Geographic for all 24 student winners and their families, as well as leading educators, game designers, and policy makers from across the country. Ive been involved with the STEM Challenge []

Through a new partnership with the Games for Change Student Challenge, there will be a new prize stream theGames for Change Prize. This middle and high school prize is open to any STEM Challenge playable game submission created by an individual working alone or in a team with up to four members that was designed to help people to learn, improve their communities, and contribute to make the world a better place. Submissions will be evaluated on gameplay, creativity, and content. Visit theGames for Change Prize pageto learn more.

The National STEM Video Game Challenge today announced the winners of the 2017 competition. This years winners include 23 middle and high school students who submitted original video games and game design concepts in platforms including GameMaker, Gamestar Mechanic, Scratch, and Unity. Visit the2017 Challenge Winners pageto learn more about the winners and their games.

The International Game Developers Association (IGDA) Game Design Special Interest Group recently held a Mentor Ask Me Anything (AMA) with Game Writers in conjunction with the National STEM Video Game Challenge. Teachers and students throughout the United States contributed questions about the process of writing original video games. The expert panel moderated by Felix Wilhelmy featured: Sheri []

The National STEM Video Game Challenge today announced the winners of the 2017 competition. This years winners include 23 middle and high school students who submitted original video games and game design concepts in platforms including GameMaker, Gamestar Mechanic, Scratch, and Unity. Presented by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and E-Line Media, []

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